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Do you believe Cooper lived or died. the option are below to cast a vote...

0% Cooper lived
6 (11.1%)
25% Cooper lived
4 (7.4%)
35% Cooper lived.
2 (3.7%)
50% Cooper lived
11 (20.4%)
75% Cooper lived
12 (22.2%)
100 Cooper lived
19 (35.2%)

Total Members Voted: 49

Author Topic: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case  (Read 588852 times)

Offline Shutter

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #7425 on: October 09, 2021, 02:16:33 PM »
Tina was mistaken on the color...reason? the red light is on the control box in the back that she is use to seeing..
 

Offline Shutter

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #7426 on: October 09, 2021, 02:18:11 PM »
Quote
Shutter, do you know if there were any NWA mechanics or other personnel onboard for the FBI tests to do the actual lowering of the stairs?

Who ever was in the back during testing lowered the stairs. who actually did this is not known. the door can be seen open during flight..
 

Online snowmman

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #7427 on: October 09, 2021, 02:21:54 PM »
Here's a jacket that was for sale on ebay from an estate

Saigon Sport Parachute club patch on the front. Not sure where 2nd patch is from.

I also include a another saigon parachute club patch I found on a french collector's site. Unknown what kind of club that was, or time period.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2021, 02:30:02 PM by snowmman »
 

Offline Shutter

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #7428 on: October 09, 2021, 02:23:32 PM »
Pressurizing the plane had 3 modes...auto, standby and manual..
 

Online snowmman

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #7429 on: October 09, 2021, 02:27:00 PM »
looking at the lights in that 727 flight manual (2nd page) I posted

it does seem like there are lights for all doors, saying whether locked or not.

I guess the transacript doesn't include any info about light changes due to the door locked/unlocked.
 

Online snowmman

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #7430 on: October 09, 2021, 02:27:38 PM »
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Pressurizing the plane had 3 modes...auto, standby and manual..

is there anything in the transcript that talk about  the state of those modes?
 

Offline Shutter

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #7431 on: October 09, 2021, 02:29:00 PM »
 

Offline Shutter

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #7432 on: October 09, 2021, 02:29:42 PM »
 

Online snowmman

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #7433 on: October 11, 2021, 02:11:36 PM »
the titanium and titanium+stainless steel smashed together, makes me want to look at refrigeration heat exchangers

what do people think?

see attached

I like the mention of "titanium clad steel tube" and "occasionally roller expanded or explosion weleded to galvanically compatible non-titanium products"

Just have to research the history of the use of titanium in heat exchangers
 

Online snowmman

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #7434 on: October 11, 2021, 02:19:50 PM »
interesting article about refrigerated truck use in Vietnam War

"We Were Reefer Kings"

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FORT KNOX, Ky. -- Veterans Day, a day we as a nation stop to honor those who have served. No matter if it's one week in basic training or if the ultimate sacrifice has been paid, American veterans are owed a debt of gratitude that can never be repaid.

In 1965, the 1st Logistical Command, the precursor of what is now known as the 1st Theater Sustainment Command, began sending troops to Vietnam. The mission of the 1st Log was to act as the logistics headquarters for all units in the theater. In Vietnam, the command parented the U.S. Army Support Command, Da Nang, U.S. Army Support Command, Qui Nhon, U.S. Army Support Command, Cam Ranh Bay, and U.S. Army Support Command, Saigon, as well as other smaller commands.

In 1968-69, several Soldiers from the 1st Log spent a year rotation in Vietnam. They trained to be 'reefers' or refrigeration mechanics. This is their story:

Roger Ashworth, a lifelong resident of Bakersfield, CA joined at the age of 18 when he noticed his entire neighborhood became empty. Thinking he would receive draft orders soon, he went to find out his draft status.

"I went down to the draft board and they said, you'll be drafted in three months," Ashworth said.

After learning the news, Ashworth decided to not wait and worry. Instead, he went to his local Army recruiting station and signed up to be refrigeration mechanic.

Ashworth asked himself, "When was the last time you heard of a reefer getting killed in Vietnam?"

Upon arriving to Vietnam, Ashworth was assigned to the 1st Log, 379th Transportation Company. He reported to the reefer shop to learn how to build air conditioners.

"We were known as the 'Reefer Kings'," Ashworth said. "We called our patch the Orient Express. It was a red dragon sitting on top of a tire wheel. The reason for the name, one, our location and two because we were always moving conveys of food or ammo."

Ashworth said the trucks driven in Vietnam were the minesweepers. They were a reefer trailer outfit, and food was the top priority.




Some more detail on refrigeration of food deliveries during vietnam war

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« Last Edit: October 11, 2021, 02:42:17 PM by snowmman »
 

Online snowmman

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #7435 on: October 11, 2021, 02:55:06 PM »
Refrigeration was everywhere during vietnam war

example pic attached
Refrigeration Containers And Storage Area At Cholon

also: "300,000 square feet of refrigerated storage" at this one port

n 1965 NAS Da Nang only had 3 small piers, 3 LST ramps, and a stone quay. The facility had
limited storage and there was a paucity of dependable exit routes from the port. These limitations
resulted in significant challenges as ships arrived with cargo that needed to be offloaded, stored,
and transported. 
 
NSA Da Nang grew dramatically over the next three years. Seabee crews constructed three deep
draft piers to support oceangoing vessels, two 300-foot wood piers, an LST causeway, a Bridge
Complex consisting of a 1,600-foot-long wharf, 300,000 square feet of refrigerated storage, and
500,000 square feet of covered storage. Crews also laid amphibious fuel lines on the sea floor.
The fuel lines linked to storage tanks north of the NSA at Red Mountain and south of the facility
at the Marble Mountain air facility.

also in this summary from the entire war: "18,507 cubic yards of refrigerated storage created"

By the end of the Vietnam War, the statistics for logistics include:

▪ 352 billion U.S. dollars spent on the war
▪ 760,000 tons of supplies arrived each month
▪ 10 million field rations were consumed each month
▪ 71,000 tons of ammunition was expended each month
▪ 124,537 flown B-57 missions
▪ 1,633,035 tons of ordnance dropped
▪ 18 B-52s were lost to enemy action
▪ 13 B-52s were lost in collisions and accident
▪ 750 Aircraft (fixed-wing) were lost in Vietnam
▪ 12,000 helicopters saw service in Vietnam (all services)
▪ 4,865 helicopters were downed by Communist ground fire
▪ 2.59 million Americas saw service in Vietnam
▪ 3,500,000 acres of Vietnam were sprayed
▪ 19 million gallons of defoliants were used, the effects of which will last 100 years
▪ 80 million gallons of petroleum products were consumed each month
▪ 82,657 acres of airfields were paved
▪ 44,478 acres of covered and open storage facilities were built
▪ 18,507 cubic yards of refrigerated storage created
▪ 2,945 miles of roads built
▪ 5,030 yards of bridges constructed
▪ 15 large fortified bases were built in Vietnam
▪ 10,000 artillery rounds expended in one day by the U.S. in Vietnam 141
« Last Edit: October 11, 2021, 03:09:56 PM by snowmman »
 

Online snowmman

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #7436 on: October 11, 2021, 03:48:20 PM »
I've noted in the past various things in Sheridan's book, that give me a headache, trying to decide "coincidence" or "interesting"...

Now what are the odds, that there would be a reference to refrigeration repair? I'm expecting they had big industrial refrigeration, probably ammonia based.


"Olson felt a new surge of life. There was the sweet taste of revenge. He'd fix Brock. He'd fix all of them. He'd have it arranged so that he could teach Roy Aupick's electricians when the new training director visited the site. Aupick was one of the few foremen Olson respected. There were four others: Hirsh at the steel plant, Sweeney at the auto mechanics shop and a new guy who had taken charge of the refrigeration repair department, and then there was Manning, the assistant manager at the transportation and supply office"

These details come from Sheridan's job(s) before he became a USAID employee

i.e. from one of these two jobs where he was involved in training (welding, refrigeration & air conditioning mentioned)

1966-1967 As Training Supervisor at Pacific Architects & Engineers, Cu Chi, Vietnam, directed the design, development and implementation of carpentry, sheet metal, plumbing, surveying, refrigeration & air conditioning, electrical, welding, auto mechanics, painting, cable splicing, and building structure courses both as OJT and in a formal classroom setting. Also introduced clerical and administrative ESL training to the job site.

1965-1966 As Vocational Training Supervisor for the Raymond /Morrison & Knudsen/Brown & Root/Jones Construction Conglomerate at Tu Duc, Vietnam, organized and directed vocational training courses in heavy equipment operation, electrical maintenance & repair, welding, warehouse procedure, painting, forklift operation, sanitation & pest control, site security, and first aid & safety.

This  passage from the book is interesting too. Shows the hands-on nature of Sheridan's work, in doing the training curriculum

"As an experiment, Olson had been teaching Aupick's electricians at their workplace. There at present refurbishing a warehouse. Teaching them at their work site had its advantages. Everything they needed to know about their job was there. Aupick always had things set up for him. Not only had he constructed benches for the electricians, but hte tools and material he wanted taught were laid out. Each item was carefully labelled. He was very particular about hte items' nomenclature"

Goes on to talk about how Aupick and Olson worked together to develop the lesson plans.
« Last Edit: October 11, 2021, 03:49:29 PM by snowmman »
 

Online snowmman

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #7437 on: October 11, 2021, 04:03:30 PM »
Some hits on Pacific Architects & Engineers refrigeration work in vietnam war

from an obit
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n 1969, he [Marshall John Clewett]  sold the business and worked in Vietnam for Pacific Architects & Engineers, maintaining electrical & refrigeration equipment at military installations

 
 

Online snowmman

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #7438 on: October 11, 2021, 05:07:13 PM »
Musing

Hand tool, not lathe, for Ti cuttings

Tubing, pipe cutter and reamer (inside)  for mechanical compression fitting?
 

Online snowmman

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #7439 on: October 11, 2021, 05:20:12 PM »
Interesting use of a jigsaw to cut thick Ti

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Hacksaw probably work on tubing?