Poll

Do you believe Cooper lived or died. the option are below to cast a vote...

0% Cooper lived
6 (12.2%)
25% Cooper lived
3 (6.1%)
35% Cooper lived.
2 (4.1%)
50% Cooper lived
10 (20.4%)
75% Cooper lived
10 (20.4%)
100 Cooper lived
18 (36.7%)

Total Members Voted: 44

Author Topic: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case  (Read 499971 times)

Offline Chaucer

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #6330 on: April 11, 2021, 06:30:31 PM »
Here is the sketch I found in the 302s to the composite sketch created by Sluggo:

 

Pretty similar IMO. Biggest difference is the shape and length of the nose.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2021, 06:31:10 PM by Chaucer »
 

Offline georger

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #6331 on: April 12, 2021, 01:01:16 AM »
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Here is the sketch I found in the 302s to the composite sketch created by Sluggo:

 

Pretty similar IMO. Biggest difference is the shape and length of the nose.

Eight FBI sketches (released?) via TK .........  the 302 sketch looks like #3 of these ?
« Last Edit: April 12, 2021, 01:39:08 AM by georger »
 

Offline Chaucer

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #6332 on: April 13, 2021, 11:35:53 AM »


They are certainly very, very similar. I'd suggest that any differences are caused by the transferring of images into the newspaper format.
 

Offline DBfan57

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #6333 on: April 14, 2021, 09:18:34 AM »
Another stupid YouTube show on DB Cooper. It starts out "1961".  So I called them a bunch of morons and said its 1971.  How do you get that wrong the minute you start your cartoon bullshit show with things we have heard a million times?
 

Offline EU

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #6334 on: April 14, 2021, 02:09:50 PM »
Random thoughts regarding the DNA:

First, I wish I knew precisely why the FBI is as certain as they are that they actually have DBC's DNA.

Second, while we don't know how strong the partial is, my understanding is that it has to be reasonably strong given that the FBI is dealing with a decent number of loci and they have actually expended significant resources in acquiring and effecting DNA comparisons.

Third, I'd like to know why Sheridan isn't in the files and whether they actually tested McCoy, the Shelton suspect, and the Egg Harbor suspect.

Fourth, given that the FBI has been very public about Duane Weber and LD Cooper not matching the partial, I'd like to know why they've been so tight-lipped about the other DNA suspects.
Some men see things as they are, and ask why? I dream of things that never were, and ask why not?

RFK
 
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Offline Chaucer

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #6335 on: April 16, 2021, 06:12:20 PM »
I have a question that I hope some of you may be able to answer or at least shed light on. Regarding Fort Lewis in the 1950s what units were stationed there? I know that the 2nd Infantry Division was housed there prior to deployment to Korea, but upon the return to the States after the war, the 2nd ID was disbanded. What units were stationed there after 1953 until Vietnam? Any ideas?
 

Offline Shutter

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #6336 on: April 16, 2021, 07:25:17 PM »
In 1945 the post shifted gears and established separation centers to quickly discharge returning soldiers. Northeast Fort Lewis functioned as a separation center discharging 200,000 servicemen between November 1945 and February 1946.

Fort Lewis and Tacoma enthusiastically welcomed the 2nd Infantry Division following the war. The division with its impressive World War II record would train and ready for any future conflict. It was not long in coming. With the North Korean invasion of South Korea on June 25, 1950, and the American response, the 2nd Infantry "Indianhead" Division was provided more equipment and sent to Korea, arriving at Pusan on August 3, 1950. The "Second to None" division warriors fought until the end of the war.

Two regimental barracks areas were constructed during the 1950s, with permanent concrete buildings. Following the Korean War, the 2nd Infantry Division returned for a short stay and then 4th Infantry "Famous Fourth" Division called the fort home. In 1966 the 4th Infantry Division deployed to Vietnam. The post became an Army Training Center, and Replacement Center, training soldiers, sending and receiving them from the Pacific.

On May 26, 1972, the 9th Infantry Division reactivated in official ceremonies. The division launched a campaign to attract volunteers and earned distinction by being the first all-volunteer division. The division trained in fast attack and mobile infantry movement. Fort Lewis gained increasing relevance in the Pacific with the activation of I Corps on October 1, 1981. I Corps and Fort Lewis contributed substantially to Desert Shield and Desert Storm (the Gulf War) in 1990-1991.

In the 1980s and to the present the installation has undergone a massive building program. A new Madigan hospital opened in 1992. Attractive barracks have replaced the World War II temporary buildings. However, the historic buildings from the 1920s and 1930s construction have been well-preserved.

Following September 11, 2001, I Corps and Fort Lewis units assumed a significant role in the "Global War on Terrorism." Stryker Brigades, equipped with Stryker armored vehicles (named for Medal of Honor recipients Private First Class Stuart Stryker [1924-1945] and Specialist Four Robert F. Stryker [1944-1967]), demonstrated rapid deployment and effectiveness. I Corps also drew upon other Fort Lewis assets such as the Special Forces, Ranger units, Special Operations, and National Guard and Reserve units.

The 2005 Base Realignment Commission directed that Fort Lewis and the adjacent McChord Air Force Base merge. The merger was part of a nationwide movement toward joint basing, the culmination of an effort beginning in the mid-1980s to unify the separate military services and bring about more effective inter-service operations. On October 1, 2010, Fort Lewis and McChord Air Force Base became Joint Base Lewis-McChord or JBLM.
 

Offline Shutter

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #6337 on: April 16, 2021, 07:31:16 PM »
U.S. soldiers were not the only ones who deployed to Korea from Washington. On November 16, 1950, Canadian troops arrived at Fort Lewis. Occupying barracks in adjacent North Fort Lewis, they trained and prepared for combat on the peninsula. It was the first time that a large Canadian force trained in the United States. The Second Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (called the "Princess Pats"), was an experienced force, with 35 percent of the men being World War II veterans. The 1,100 Princess Pats spent only four days at North Fort Lewis, then sailed from the Seattle Port of Embarkation bound for Korea. Arriving in December, the Princess Pats went into eight weeks of training. They had their initial combat on February 22, 1951, as the first Canadian infantry unit to fight in the Korean War. The unit distinguished itself in the war.

Another Canadian infantry unit that trained at North Fort Lewis was the 25th Infantry Brigade. With some 6,000 troops, the brigade required more time to prepare for battle. It departed Seattle in mid April 1951 for Korea. The 25th Infantry Brigade fought with the British Commonwealth forces.
 

Offline Chaucer

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #6338 on: April 16, 2021, 07:58:10 PM »
Thanks, Shut. The years I’m looking for specifically are 1951 to 1956.
 

Offline DBfan57

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #6339 on: April 17, 2021, 03:32:49 PM »
If a 94 year old man can comb the woods in the Pacific Northwest for Bigfoot even now, the guy who had hairs investigated by the FBI, why don't all of you on here get some damn metal detectors, set the at 2 foot depth, and GET OUT THERE!!!!!!!  Take a day from your conference and get out there and beat the woods where they suspected him to fall.  Go back to Tena Bar and get an army out there with metal detectors. Its better than head banging on here daily and not being able to get Tina or Florence to join you.  You need Mucklow.  She does not need you.  But I would think she would have some curiosity.  Get her a metal detector too!!!!  LOL :chr2:
 

Offline Robert99

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #6340 on: April 17, 2021, 03:50:37 PM »
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If a 94 year old man can comb the woods in the Pacific Northwest for Bigfoot even now, the guy who had hairs investigated by the FBI, why don't all of you on here get some damn metal detectors, set the at 2 foot depth, and GET OUT THERE!!!!!!!  Take a day from your conference and get out there and beat the woods where they suspected him to fall.  Go back to Tena Bar and get an army out there with metal detectors. Its better than head banging on here daily and not being able to get Tina or Florence to join you.  You need Mucklow.  She does not need you.  But I would think she would have some curiosity.  Get her a metal detector too!!!!  LOL :chr2:

Great post!  The woods have been searched in the location(s) where the Powers That Be thought Cooper landed and they did not find one single thing.

A limited area around the money location at Tena Bar has been searched with metal detectors and nothing was found there either.

But a larger search just upstream of the money location would definitely be worthwhile in my always humble opinion.  The total area to be searched is quite a bit less than one-half of a square mile.  There are some non-profit organizations that do such searches in connection with law enforcement activities.  These organizations also use equipment such as ground-penetrating radar.  Such equipment would be ideal for such a search.

Would you know of such an organization or anyone who would be interested in participating in such a search?
 

Offline EU

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #6341 on: April 17, 2021, 05:13:09 PM »
As noted in previous posts, I have identified a spot near Tena Bar that is of considerable interest and may hold the parachutes and attache' case. Moreover, when I was at Tena Bar a few weeks back I searched this spot with a magnetic locator and got a hit. I have not dug anything as of yet. That said, a physical dig and search of the area will be taking place the beginning of May.

« Last Edit: April 17, 2021, 05:21:34 PM by EU »
Some men see things as they are, and ask why? I dream of things that never were, and ask why not?

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Offline Chaucer

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #6342 on: April 17, 2021, 09:34:20 PM »
Did Cooper say that he wanted to go to Phoenix after he was told Mexico City was a no go?
 

Offline EU

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #6343 on: April 17, 2021, 10:39:49 PM »
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Did Cooper say that he wanted to go to Phoenix after he was told Mexico City was a no go?

My understanding is that Cooper asked about Phoenix and Yuma. If this is accurate, the Yuma suggestion is odd given that Yuma is not exactly well known. There is a joint military base in Yuma and Boeing has been testing aircraft there for many years.
Some men see things as they are, and ask why? I dream of things that never were, and ask why not?

RFK
 

Offline Robert99

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Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Reply #6344 on: April 17, 2021, 11:06:31 PM »
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Did Cooper say that he wanted to go to Phoenix after he was told Mexico City was a no go?

My understanding is that Cooper asked about Phoenix and Yuma. If this is accurate, the Yuma suggestion is odd given that Yuma is not exactly well known. There is a joint military base in Yuma and Boeing has been testing aircraft there for many years.

Douglas also had a test facility at Yuma.  I believe the DC-10 was tested there.  So the Yuma suggestion may suggest that Cooper had a connection with one of the major aircraft manufacturers.

For the record, Boeing and the other manufacturers did testing at various temporary locations for specific purposes such as high altitude testing, cold-weather testing, etc., etc...   

Boeing has had a testing facility at Moses Lake, Washington long predating the hijacking.  This facility was also used for training airline pilots and other personnel on various Boeing aircraft. 

Assuming Boeing did the testing for the aft stairs deployed at Moses Lake, any number of people from who knows where could have witnessed it or heard about there.  And this testing was public knowledge due to news stories in aircraft publications about the same time the 727 went into airline service in 1964.