Author Topic: Suspects And Confessions  (Read 552864 times)

Offline Bruce A. Smith

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Re: Suspects And Confessions
« Reply #4785 on: August 25, 2021, 03:41:12 AM »
Yup, $116 to re-fuel Flight 305. Av gas was $0.16/gal. That's what the WSHM reported.

In 1971, I remember working for two bucks an hour and thought it was a decent wage. If I remember correctly, gas for one's car was $0.19/gal. A brand-new VW bug was 2K.
 
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Offline Parrotheadvol

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Re: Suspects And Confessions
« Reply #4786 on: August 25, 2021, 10:16:43 AM »
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Good for the Yanks!  :bravo:   Guess it will be Cincinnati and the SOX next year at the Field of Dreams.

Add this to your collection:  fuel ticket for 305 the night of the hijacking. 3874 gal total:  $116.22 !  Can that be right?   :-\

Nope, official word came down a few days ago that it will be the Reds and Cubs. I think the Reds and White Sox makes more sense though as those were the two teams involved in the infamous black sox scandal. It's hard to look at Shoeless Joe's stats through that series and believe he had a part in throwing it. As a lifelong Reds fan (BOO Yankees!), I would love to go to this. My son is a freshman on his high school baseball team and I would love to take him to it. Unfortunately, the price and the scarcity of the tickets will make that virtually impossible. I am traveling back to Iowa next week though, and may leave a day early and catch the Reds and Cards on Monday night. It's been a couple of years since I've been to a game. And even then, I got there in the 7th inning. I was traveling back from Michigan and was determined that I was going to stop and watch baseball and enjoy a hot dog and a few beers. That's exactly what I did.

Stay safe up in Cooper / Covid country Bruce, it looks like things are getting crazy again.
« Last Edit: August 25, 2021, 10:17:55 AM by Parrotheadvol »
 

Offline Robert99

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Re: Suspects And Confessions
« Reply #4787 on: August 25, 2021, 01:34:00 PM »
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Covid in Cooper Country

My county, Pierce County, which includes Tacoma - but not Sea-Tac airport - is reporting the worst numbers of Covid infections this week - greater than at any time in the pandemic. 40 or so new cases per day, with 3-4 deaths per day. The Gov has issued a mask mandate for everyone to wear one indoors, regardless of vax status. Maybe 40% of the population are wearing theirs. I'm selective - I'm wearing mine in the grocery store, but not in a diner. I usually sit way off by myself when I eat out, or out on the patio. But the world seems indifferent about it all.

More troubling, the tensions between the vax and unvaxed is escalating. The anger is mounting on both sides to the point where I have become fearful of violence. Friendships and long-standing relationships are fracturing all around me.

The realization that the vaccines are not making people bullet-proof - giving them the customary 100% immunity - is also sobering, adding to the tensions.

Add it all up, and people are beginning to hunker-down voluntarily. Restaurants are again half-empty or less. I walked into a Denny's yesterday for din-din and the waitresses out-numbered the guests 4-2. I haven't talked to Eric recently, but the chances that CC21 will be held are fading. Currently, I rate it 60-40, as Covid is worse in the very rural and conservative SW Washington. Clark County is a veritable hot spot.

On the good news front, the Yankees just won their 11th straight. Go Yankees. The Mariners are playing well, too. Go figure.

Good for the Yanks!  :bravo:   Guess it will be Cincinnati and the SOX next year at the Field of Dreams.

Add this to your collection:  fuel ticket for 305 the night of the hijacking. 3874 gal total:  $116.22 !  Can that be right?   :-\

I don't believe this is for the cost of the fuel itself.  Rather, it is probably a charge for the refueling services out on a remote ramp and some distance from the usual refueling point which would be the ramp at the passenger terminal.  The cost of Jet-A fuel was probably somewhere near 20 cents per gallon in 1971.
 

Offline Bruce A. Smith

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Re: Suspects And Confessions
« Reply #4788 on: August 25, 2021, 04:44:06 PM »
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Good for the Yanks!  :bravo:   Guess it will be Cincinnati and the SOX next year at the Field of Dreams.

Add this to your collection:  fuel ticket for 305 the night of the hijacking. 3874 gal total:  $116.22 !  Can that be right?   :-\

Nope, official word came down a few days ago that it will be the Reds and Cubs. I think the Reds and White Sox makes more sense though as those were the two teams involved in the infamous black sox scandal. It's hard to look at Shoeless Joe's stats through that series and believe he had a part in throwing it. As a lifelong Reds fan (BOO Yankees!), I would love to go to this. My son is a freshman on his high school baseball team and I would love to take him to it. Unfortunately, the price and the scarcity of the tickets will make that virtually impossible. I am traveling back to Iowa next week though, and may leave a day early and catch the Reds and Cards on Monday night. It's been a couple of years since I've been to a game. And even then, I got there in the 7th inning. I was traveling back from Michigan and was determined that I was going to stop and watch baseball and enjoy a hot dog and a few beers. That's exactly what I did.

Stay safe up in Cooper / Covid country Bruce, it looks like things are getting crazy again.

Even if you don't see the MLB game at Dyersville, Parrot, I highly recommend a trip there at any time. The original ballfield used in the movie is still there, along with the house that Kevin Costner's character lived in. I was there in 2000-ish, and I loved it. Still have my souvenir baseball from there.
 
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Offline snowmman

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Re: Suspects And Confessions
« Reply #4789 on: September 08, 2021, 08:01:43 PM »
I never asked him, but it always bothered me how Sheridan managed to have a visa for the amount of time he was in Nepal

Visas has recently been relaxed for Nepal. But back in 70s it was still pretty constrained?
He wasn't working, so I would think he had a tourist visa

They were doing a bunch of stuff to encourage tourism starting in the late 60s and tourism started to increase (it was really small in the 60s)

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that url has this paragraph (the report is from 1974, so this is pre-1974 info)

In no case does the Royal Nepalese Embassy (U.S., India, or other
countries) issue more than two-week visas for entering Nepal. All extensions must be obtained after arrival. However, prior clearance from the Institute (a procedure which may soon be required) us a strong guarantee of a visa extension.



I had a very quick look at Sheridan's passport from that era, and I believe I saw just one Nepal entry and one Nepal exit stamp at the expected times.

But they were years apart if I remember right. My understanding is that back then passports got stamped on all entry/exit between countries? Not sure.


So it's odd that he never got nailed for staying past his visa. Or what he did. Maybe things were looser then.

If he was working, I could see getting some kind of work visa.
But I would think all he would have been able to get was a tourist visa? which back then would have been much shorter than the length of time he spent there.

I was musing about whether he could have had multiple passports. I think not..
Just another random confusing thing.

In his book he talks about one of his characters have $20k in saigon in savings, and using that to fund the time writing the documentary in Nepal. Maybe he showed that he had money, and they let him live there. Maybe saying he was a writer?
« Last Edit: September 08, 2021, 08:33:01 PM by snowmman »
 
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Offline Lynn

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Re: Suspects And Confessions
« Reply #4790 on: September 08, 2021, 08:48:33 PM »
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I never asked him, but it always bothered me how Sheridan managed to have a visa for the amount of time he was in Nepal

Visa has recently been relaxed for Nepal. But back in 70s it was still pretty constrained?
He wasn't working, so I would think he had a tourist visa

They were doing a bunch of stuff to encourage tourism starting in the late 60s and tourism started to increase (it was really small in the 60s)

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that url has this paragraph
In no case does the Royal Nepalese Embassy (U.S., India, or other
countries) issue more than two-week visas for entering Nepal. All extensions must be obtained after arrival. However, prior clearance from the Institute (a procedure which may soon be required) us a strong guarantee of a visa extension.



I had a very quick look at Sheridan's passport from that era, and I believe I saw just one Nepal entry and one Nepal exit stamp at the expected times.

But they were years apart if I remember right. My understanding is that back then passports got stamped on all entry/exit between countries? Not sure.


So it's odd that he never got nailed for staying past his visa. Or what he did. Maybe things were looser then.

If he was working, I could see getting some kind of work visa.
But I would think all he would have been able to get was a tourist visa? which back then would have been much shorter than the length of time he spent there.

I was musing about whether he could have had multiple passports. I think not..
Just another random confusing thing.

In his book he talks about one of his characters have $20k in saigon in savings, and using that to fund the time writing the documentary in Nepal. Maybe he showed that he had money, and they let him live there. Maybe saying he was a writer?
It may just have been more lax, or he may have had to pay off someone a bit of money to overlook it. I don't know much about the Nepalese economy of the time, but you could live pretty splendidly on $10 a day in Thailand in the Nineties, so I don't imagine you needed much to be considered reasonably well-off in 1971 Nepal. Passports were a lot easier to fake back then, too, and with little or no computer tracking, he could even have applied for a replacement passport for one that wasn't missing without setting off any bells going through Customs anywhere. Hard call.

If he was there the whole time legitimately, I suppose it's possible the US ambassador wanted him out of Vietnam quickly enough to be willing to arrange it. Or, as you say, he could have shown he had enough money to stay a spell without working. Or if his wife had gotten Vietnamese citizenship and was stating she was the sole wage-earner; but in some parts of Asia I visited, you couldn't really become a citizen so much as a permanent resident, in some cases even if you were born in the country but your parents weren't. Can't say re: Nepal, though.

That's part of why SP is so hard to eliminate. He was already roaming, not missing on US Thanksgiving and could easily have told his wife he was going home to see ailing family. Kids would have been too young to ever remember. Unknown source of income for several years, inexplicable visa status in Nepal thus far. Of course, there were those who thought he was in too many world hot-spots in his life, with too little known journalistic output, to explain it beyond bad luck, a thirst for action, or some kind of intelligence position. But given his later stances in life, it's also hard to imagine SP working for the CIA or other such agency.
 

Offline snowmman

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Re: Suspects And Confessions
« Reply #4791 on: September 08, 2021, 08:52:53 PM »
I also wondered why he left Nepal after a couple years and went back to Vietnam and went back to work.

That smells like "out of money" ...surely there could have been better places to travel if tired of Nepal.

it's unclear if he really had $20k of savings at point. He might have saved that much from his time in Vietnam.

EDIT: Sheridan most definitely did not work for the CIA.
read his book and you'll understand him more. You'll be surprised that an old man would want a book published that really made him seem like an ass. (like his perception of women).
You'll read the word "cock" more than you expect, in unpleasant ways.

I was also wondering about his Filipino wife. What she thought about living in a hut in Nepal (and having two kids there). Wondered if she pushed him to move on.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2021, 08:55:31 PM by snowmman »
 

Offline snowmman

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Re: Suspects And Confessions
« Reply #4792 on: September 08, 2021, 08:57:53 PM »
I had the accidental opportunity to look at Sheridan's passports at one time.
I immediately felt like an ass, since I hadn't asked permission.

But it's one thing I wish I could have closely examined.

He had the whole stack of his passports on a table next to a desk I was working at.
I've recently mused whether it was a setup, and he might have expected me to look :)
cooper nut thinking :)
 
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Offline Lynn

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Re: Suspects And Confessions
« Reply #4793 on: September 08, 2021, 08:59:36 PM »
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I also wondered why he left Nepal after a couple years and went back to Vietnam and went back to work.

That smells like "out of money" ...surely there could have been better places to travel if tired of Nepal.

it's unclear if he really had $20k of savings at point. He might have saved that much from his time in Vietnam.

I was also wondering about his Filipino wife. What she thought about living in a hut in Nepal (and having two kids there). Wondered if she pushed him to move on.
It's possible he was a good saver, and/or that his wife may have wished to leave Nepal. I don't know her background. I can say, though, that I've been to the Philippines and poverty there had to be at least as bad as it was in Nepal. I saw children playing on garbage dumps, people serving tourists steak while eating only rice themselves, and overheard a rich woman who had "made it out" loudly insisting that the poor should be treated badly for their own good. Don't know her family history/financial situation (I don't even know her name) or how she herself ended up in Nepal, so it's hard to say how comfortable she was with hut life, or whether she hope her husband would bring her a more comfortable life. Would love to know more about her.
 

Offline Lynn

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Re: Suspects And Confessions
« Reply #4794 on: September 08, 2021, 09:00:53 PM »
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I had the accidental opportunity to look at Sheridan's passports at one time.
I immediately felt like an ass, since I hadn't asked permission.

But it's one thing I wish I could have closely examined.

He had the whole stack of his passports on a table next to a desk I was working at.
I've recently mused whether it was a setup, and he might have expected me to look :)
cooper nut thinking :)
Haha you're in good company. I'd have had a hard time not looking myself.
 

Offline snowmman

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Re: Suspects And Confessions
« Reply #4795 on: September 09, 2021, 02:07:36 AM »
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I also wondered why he left Nepal after a couple years and went back to Vietnam and went back to work.

That smells like "out of money" ...surely there could have been better places to travel if tired of Nepal.

it's unclear if he really had $20k of savings at point. He might have saved that much from his time in Vietnam.

I was also wondering about his Filipino wife. What she thought about living in a hut in Nepal (and having two kids there). Wondered if she pushed him to move on.
It's possible he was a good saver, and/or that his wife may have wished to leave Nepal. I don't know her background. I can say, though, that I've been to the Philippines and poverty there had to be at least as bad as it was in Nepal. I saw children playing on garbage dumps, people serving tourists steak while eating only rice themselves, and overheard a rich woman who had "made it out" loudly insisting that the poor should be treated badly for their own good. Don't know her family history/financial situation (I don't even know her name) or how she herself ended up in Nepal, so it's hard to say how comfortable she was with hut life, or whether she hope her husband would bring her a more comfortable life. Would love to know more about her.

well here's the thing. I don't mean to be rude, and I didn't realize you were a woman.
I don't know how to say it in just one or two sentences...but there was a lot of messed-up shit in Sheridan's life.
If you take his book at face value, he had a lot of messed-up attitudes. Although he was in a lot of messed-up situations,
there's no way getting around the fact that he was a bit of an ass. The issues behind the marriage to the Filipino are a little complicated.

All of that is what kind of pisses me off about Sheridan. I would have liked him to be a little better person, even if he was a cranky old man.

If you read his book and understand that Grecco and Olson are both him, you'll either be totally repulsed by Sheridan, or sympathetic to a messed-up dude. Both are valid responses.

At a certain point, his son/daughter deserve their privacy. Sheridan wrote his book, let it speak for him, not me. He thought it was important, he thought he was documenting "something". He would say it was the Vietnam war. Me, I'm not sure what he was documenting, or whether he even knew. Still, a wicked-smart dude, even at an old age. Could be razor-sharp with cutting criticism. It would have nice to know him when he was younger.

I was always cognizant that interacting with an old man could easily turn into elder abuse. Even though he as a piss-ant, he still was a real old guy with problems. The whole thing was a confusing, crazy situation. I wish he would have contacted me before he died.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2021, 02:17:58 AM by snowmman »