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11
DB Cooper / Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Last post by RaoulDuke24 on June 29, 2020, 03:01:12 PM »
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Sketches, Bottom Line

I've learned a few things about the sketches from Nat:

1. Tina and Alice liked the Composite A best. Flo was luke-warm.
2. Flo didn't think it was nasty enough, and eventually Composite B was developed about 8 months later. Eventually, all 3 FAs approved Composite B as a good likeness.
3. Over time, Flo didn't like B either, so in the 1980s made her own composite sketch, which I find downright scary.
4. Composite A was developed in Minneapolis with Alice, Flo, And Tina all together. Several versions were developed and then shown to "other witnesses," presumably the passengers, most likely Gregory, Mitchell, House, Spreckel and Labissioniere.
5. The initial A sketch didn't have any eyes, so it was hard to get a real good sense of the "likeness." Eyes and glasses were added later.
6. Composite B began in August of 1972, but it took almost another six months of passing several versions around to the three FAs and the group of "other witness" for final approval. The initial sketching of B with Roy Rose took place remotely. All 3 FAs were home and sent in their suggestions to Rose via separate FBI teletypes.
7. Nat's analysis comes from the 2011 interview with Rose - done by somebody - and the FBI 302s that are now available.
8. I'm not seeing any special weight given to any individual, such as Bill Mitchell, or discounted by too much emotionality, such as Flo.

Well this is all interesting, if not entertaining.  It's a level above the previous DZ/Weber discussions about sketches posted years ago. Somebody has done some actual research, for a change.

I see the Cooper hijacking as a low level 'poor man's' enterprise; not a CIA operation. If it was done to get funds, then the price was way too low! $500k should have been asked for. What grudge did Hunt have that applies to 'airlines'? And the same for any of Hunt's colleagues. Who would hire Hunt and his thugs to do an airline hijacking which has nothing to do with geopolitics? From Cooper's comments his hijacking was personal with no obvious geopolitical connection. It might be someone who worked with Hunt, a Latin person who works cheap, who didnt even have a personal parachute to bring to the party?

You make some good points here G. I also wondered why cooper didn’t ask for more money. Correct me if I’m wrong but isn’t the 200k the least amount requested for any hijacking involving ransom? The only thing I can think of is cooper knew about the 250k all packaged up and ready to go at Sea First. If he asked for over 250k the fbi would of had to scramble to come up with more cash, this might of been problematic and taken more time, seeing as it was late in the day on the eve of thanksgiving. Also he might of requested 200k because he didn’t want to ask for the exact amount they had set aside as that might of raised suspicions that cooper might of been somebody like a Hunt, who was on the inside and well connected, to have known about the ransom fund. That might also explain why cooper never asked for a specific denomination because he already knew he was gonna get what he was gonna get.

It is an interesting theory. And it also works the other way as well ---- If he knew there was 250k set aside, but did not know the denominations of that 250k, then it stands to reason why he didn't specify a denomination when he made the ransom demand. He didn't want to request the wrong denomination because that would have caused even further delay while the airline rounded up the correct bills. So he figures he won't specify a denomination, which means he'll just take whatever they have available and it won't lead to any additional time sitting on the runway in Seattle waiting.

If he knew the ransom was in $20 bills, maybe he had to determine how much weight he was comfortable jumping with. I believe the 200k came in at around 23 pounds or so? So perhaps he decided that 25 pounds was going to be his comfort limit given the type of jump he was making. Maybe he knew the full 250k would have been pushing the weight limit too much?

I tend to agree that the fact he did not ask for a specific denomination was not an error or oversight on Cooper's part, but rather something he did with intention and purpose. 

12
DB Cooper / Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Last post by nickyb233 on June 29, 2020, 02:43:08 AM »
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Sketches, Bottom Line

I've learned a few things about the sketches from Nat:

1. Tina and Alice liked the Composite A best. Flo was luke-warm.
2. Flo didn't think it was nasty enough, and eventually Composite B was developed about 8 months later. Eventually, all 3 FAs approved Composite B as a good likeness.
3. Over time, Flo didn't like B either, so in the 1980s made her own composite sketch, which I find downright scary.
4. Composite A was developed in Minneapolis with Alice, Flo, And Tina all together. Several versions were developed and then shown to "other witnesses," presumably the passengers, most likely Gregory, Mitchell, House, Spreckel and Labissioniere.
5. The initial A sketch didn't have any eyes, so it was hard to get a real good sense of the "likeness." Eyes and glasses were added later.
6. Composite B began in August of 1972, but it took almost another six months of passing several versions around to the three FAs and the group of "other witness" for final approval. The initial sketching of B with Roy Rose took place remotely. All 3 FAs were home and sent in their suggestions to Rose via separate FBI teletypes.
7. Nat's analysis comes from the 2011 interview with Rose - done by somebody - and the FBI 302s that are now available.
8. I'm not seeing any special weight given to any individual, such as Bill Mitchell, or discounted by too much emotionality, such as Flo.

Well this is all interesting, if not entertaining.  It's a level above the previous DZ/Weber discussions about sketches posted years ago. Somebody has done some actual research, for a change.

I see the Cooper hijacking as a low level 'poor man's' enterprise; not a CIA operation. If it was done to get funds, then the price was way too low! $500k should have been asked for. What grudge did Hunt have that applies to 'airlines'? And the same for any of Hunt's colleagues. Who would hire Hunt and his thugs to do an airline hijacking which has nothing to do with geopolitics? From Cooper's comments his hijacking was personal with no obvious geopolitical connection. It might be someone who worked with Hunt, a Latin person who works cheap, who didnt even have a personal parachute to bring to the party?

You make some good points here G. I also wondered why cooper didn’t ask for more money. Correct me if I’m wrong but isn’t the 200k the least amount requested for any hijacking involving ransom? The only thing I can think of is cooper knew about the 250k all packaged up and ready to go at Sea First. If he asked for over 250k the fbi would of had to scramble to come up with more cash, this might of been problematic and taken more time, seeing as it was late in the day on the eve of thanksgiving. Also he might of requested 200k because he didn’t want to ask for the exact amount they had set aside as that might of raised suspicions that cooper might of been somebody like a Hunt, who was on the inside and well connected, to have known about the ransom fund. That might also explain why cooper never asked for a specific denomination because he already knew he was gonna get what he was gonna get.
13
DB Cooper / Re: Tina Bar Money Find
« Last post by georger on June 29, 2020, 01:49:31 AM »
Reading old posts by everyone and ran across this: 2013.

Testxyz
Sep 1, 2013, 7:22 AM
Post #46492 of 58140 (47898 views)
Re: [georger] Money Details from the FBI Archive [In reply to]
 
________________________________________
Georger said....
Quote:
Each bundle was secured by rubber band and different counts so that it appeared the money was hastily gathered."

Below is what FBI agent William Baker told the Oregonian on Feb 13 1980.

Alluded to at CitizenSleuths.com

Quote:
"Baker said the money was bundled into packages of several sizes at the time of the hijacking. "to make it appear that it was randomly done, as if it was done in a hurry." Because of that the actual amount could not be estimated, he said."

Ckret Aka Larry said this on April 1, 2008 at DZ....almost verbatim

Quote:
"It is my understanding the money was wrapped in rubber bands, no paper bands. The money was put together in different bill counts so it looked as if it was put together in a hurry. That means no two consecutive bundles had the same count.” 

..... This would make H's straps of 100 bills each incorrect, as well as two of the 302s FJ posted. There is just no end to the confusion in this case. 

Wouldnt the start and stop marks indicate how many bills and which serial numbers were in each bundle given Cooper? Or is there something about that that's wrong? If each bundle is a random count then start/stop marks should reflect that? Maybe there is an answer for this in the old posts . . .

14
DB Cooper / Re: Tina Bar Money Find
« Last post by georger on June 29, 2020, 12:13:59 AM »
The Money vs. Flyjack.

Based on Larry's interviews I think Himms comes the closest to describing how the money was assembled and sent to Cooper, with several differences.

H says: ""There were ten thousand twenty dollar bills assembled in straps of a hundred bills to a strap, and individual straps held together with rubber bands."  STRAP is an official Fed term: "A strap is a package of 100 notes.

But two problems emerged. (1) People started using the term 'bundle' or 'bundles' when referring to the Cooper money. However "BUNDLE" also turns out to be an official Fed banking term: "A bundle consists of 1,000 notes of the same denomination in ten equal straps of 100 notes each. Before depositing currency, currency must be prepared according to denomination. For $1 through $20 denominations, your deposit(s) must contain full bundles." I dont think anyone ever said or meant to imply that the Cooper bills had been assembled in Fed-type BUNDLES.

Clearly, Himm's "straps" began to be referred to as "bundles" by not only Agents but the general public.

Problem (2) is: H failed to amend his statement to say: 'There were ten thousand twenty dollar bills assembled in straps of approximately one hundred bills to a strap, in random sized straps'! Had H said that he and Larry Carr would be in agreement, as I understand the info Carr delivered after talking to bank employees.  And no paper straps were involved, in any event - only rubber bands.

The 12/2/71 302 that Flyjack has produced is the only known document that declares: "He stated the bills were made up in packets of $2000 each, and were banded with Seattle First National Bank or Federal Reserve Bank bands, or quite possibly banded with bands from other banks.  No identifying marks were placed on these bands."  This 302 doesnt say anything about rubber bands being used in the packaging! It was rubber bands the Ingrams saw and removed. Moreover, even Fkyjack says the Ingram find had rubber bands on it   ...  a position I feel FJ was reluctantly forced to admit to after months of dodging the rubber band issue in favour of paper straps (only)?. 

Flyjack could very easily claim there were no rubber bands on the Cooper money - because the 12/2/71 302 FJ is relying only speaks about "bands" ... I think everyone interprets as meaning paper straps.  God forbid that this 302 is actually talking about rubber bands  in some further contortion of reality.... the 302 only uses the word BANDS and not STRAPS ! Maybe FJ is wrong about paper straps?  ;D

People are going to come to their own conclusions. It's too bad FJ and Ckret weren't able to debate this issue together at DZ. Who knows where this would be today . . .

15
DB Cooper / Re: Tina Bar Money Find
« Last post by georger on June 28, 2020, 05:28:07 PM »
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Same old song and dance with FJ -

The word PACKET is NOT an official banking term today. Was it in 1971? I dont think so, according to the SeaFirst bank and Fed Reserve phone calls I made. FJ's defense for PACKET being an official banking term is three FBI 302's FJ presents - the same 302's he presented before. See those 302s attached. Never mind that FJ is cherry picking after saying 'you cant trust the information in 302s'. However, Himmelsbach uses an actual banking term in his video taped money description: STRAPS.

""There were ten thousand twenty dollar bills assembled in straps of a hundred bills to a strap and individual straps held together with rubber bands."

No mention of paper straps but only rubber bands . . .

BTW BUNDLES is an official banking term as defined by the Federal Reserve - all anyone has to do is Google this or go to a Federal Reserve website.

Back to basics: what are the issues the Science Team was tasked to answer? (a) how was the money prepared for delivered to Cooper on the plane, (b) what was the state of the money as found by the Ingrams, and (c) is there anything about the money that establishes how and when it arrived on Tina Bar, (d) is there anything about the money that tells us what happened to Cooper?

Let's go back to the FBI's original description of the Ingram find (in the socalled Palmer Report).

Ingram statement:
'''... the boy turned up three bundles of money wrapped with rubber bands ... The boy picked up the money and the family determined that it was $20 bills... The bills were badly decomposed but held together with rubber bands which were so old they crumbled away immediately upon handling... Once home INGRAMs brother-in-law took the rest of the rubber bands off and was going to dry out the money and try to reclaim it at a bank. They had no idea where the money had come from or what it meant. The money was in a parcel barely held together by decomposed rubber bands, which crumbled and fell away upon being handled. '''
In a separate interview years later Brian says: You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

“We are out here making a campfire, my father and I, and that’s when we discovered the three packets of $20 bills, later to be proven as ransom money of D.B. Cooper."

Brian has told others: “the money came out in pieces”. No statement of how many pieces or what pieces means. No mention of rubber bands or paper straps. Somebody in the FBI report above decided there were “there bundles”.  But, the above FBI statement does not make it clear if rubber bands were around each of three bundles, or if the rubber bands were around the whole find?   Where on the found money did INGRAMs brother-in-law remove rubber bands, or rubber band fragments. And there is no mention of paper straps in any of this.

At best the evidence is ambiguous and unclear. No FBI forensic report mentions looking for or finding rubber band fragments on any of the bills – and no paper strap remains either. FJ explains the paper straps away by saying they all “dissolved” over time.
 
The Federal Reserve rules which applied in 1971 say:

"How many bills are in a strap?"      -        Himmelsbach used the word STRAP.

"A ‘strap’ is a package of 100 notes regardless of denomination. A ‘bundle’ consists of 1,000 notes of the same denomination in ten equal straps of 100 notes each. Before depositing currency, currency must be prepared according to denomination. For $1 through $20 denominations, your deposit(s) must contain full ‘bundles’."

How were the bills being stored at SeaFirst before they were used to package a ransom for delivery to Cooper – anyone know? I thought we already knew the answer to that question but now, under the Fkyjack and Blevins regime at Dropzone, I not going to hazard saying anything about that! Anyone else dare answer or cares?

So, I guess it’s Carr and his witnesses and maybe Tom Kaye, vs Flyjack at Dropzone. Good luck to all and have a Merry Christmas!

FJ retorts quickly again:

 Georger claimed the Bank never used the term "packet".. I posted 3 FBI references of it and he still denies it...  Winning an argument is more important than the facts.

Not only do you have the facts wrong but your argument is completely irrational.

Take the L, Goerger, you lost. You always lose. You are an ignorant and arrogant lazy thinker who resorts to lies to win an argument. No wonder you have developed no suspect after over a decade (other than Ted Kaczynski based on a grudge) and spend most of your time trashing, smearing and lying about virtually everyone (EVERYONE) associated with this case in a desperate attempt to be relevant...  discredit and drag everyone else down to make your own lack of accomplishment look better.

REPLY>

 Georger claimed the Bank never used the term "packet".. I posted 3 FBI references of it and he still denies it...


No dumbass. These 302s are statements by FBI agents ... NOT statements by Seafirst Bank!

Show us a statement by SeaFirst on SeaFirst stationery that uses and verifies that the word PACKET is an official banking term, as you claim. All you have to do is go to the Fed Reserve website! But your ego wont allow you to do that. PACKET is not a formal banking term according to Ben Summerwill Fed Res ret. He worked there for thirty years vs your thirty years of your peddling DB Cooper crapola.

H was an FBI agent and he used the word STRAP! I have a 302 where H uses the word STRAP@!

You are as dense and argumentative as Blevins.

And you can also drop the Carr/Georger crapola. It was Carr and perhaps Kaye who called everyone. I simply followed Carr and Brian and his mother and others I talked with including a SeaFirst employee ...... which is more than you have ever done. I already said that decades ago. You probably looked that up years ago! 

There are ways to resolve all of this but of course you arent  interested and you havent done anything to do that!  Your ego is so fragile you cant bring yourself to even try.  You are a child.

All kinds of people have used different words or terminology for the money find thru the years. You wont even admit that! Instead you say Tina was using formal banking terms in one instance in which she uttered the word PACKET! BIG MISTAKE ON TINA'S PART! How far into left field can you go before someone like me tries to draw you back into reality? Its a good thing Cooper didn't utter the word packet or you would claim he was a banker too using formal banking terminology! Which then proves, you would say, your suspect was DB Cooper.  :P

You are crazy.   I can assure you the Cooper bills don;t give a shit!  Meanwhile everyone is stuck because of your divisive hate-filled posts. :rofl:

Himmelsbach uses the word STRAPS for the money. STRAPS is a formal Federal Reserve banking term. And STRAPS breaks down to BUNDLES which is another official banking term.

FBI agents have used all kinds of words including bundles, packets, packages ... Tina used five different words for the money. The Ingrams all said "bundles" until Brian converted to the "strap" theology for some reason! Kaye uses "bundles" . . . and on and on and on and on.  There is technical language or technical terminology vs common ordinary language commonly called slang used in normal conversation vs. in formal writing. . . and so it goes.

Show me a piece of writring by Noam Chomsky that says PACKET is a formal banking term! Produce any banker that says it is and I will call them up and have a discussion . . .  :o   
 
 
16
DB Cooper / Re: Tina Bar Money Find
« Last post by georger on June 28, 2020, 03:26:02 PM »
Same old song and dance with FJ -

The word PACKET is NOT an official banking term today. Was it in 1971? I dont think so, according to the SeaFirst bank and Fed Reserve phone calls I made. FJ's defense for PACKET being an official banking term is three FBI 302's FJ presents - the same 302's he presented before. See those 302s attached. Never mind that FJ is cherry picking after saying 'you cant trust the information in 302s'. However, Himmelsbach uses an actual banking term in his video taped money description: STRAPS.

""There were ten thousand twenty dollar bills assembled in straps of a hundred bills to a strap and individual straps held together with rubber bands."

No mention of paper straps but only rubber bands . . .

BTW BUNDLES is an official banking term as defined by the Federal Reserve - all anyone has to do is Google this or go to a Federal Reserve website.

Back to basics: what are the issues the Science Team was tasked to answer? (a) how was the money prepared for delivered to Cooper on the plane, (b) what was the state of the money as found by the Ingrams, and (c) is there anything about the money that establishes how and when it arrived on Tina Bar, (d) is there anything about the money that tells us what happened to Cooper?

Let's go back to the FBI's original description of the Ingram find (in the socalled Palmer Report).

Ingram statement:
'''... the boy turned up three bundles of money wrapped with rubber bands ... The boy picked up the money and the family determined that it was $20 bills... The bills were badly decomposed but held together with rubber bands which were so old they crumbled away immediately upon handling... Once home INGRAMs brother-in-law took the rest of the rubber bands off and was going to dry out the money and try to reclaim it at a bank. They had no idea where the money had come from or what it meant. The money was in a parcel barely held together by decomposed rubber bands, which crumbled and fell away upon being handled. '''
In a separate interview years later Brian says: You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

“We are out here making a campfire, my father and I, and that’s when we discovered the three packets of $20 bills, later to be proven as ransom money of D.B. Cooper."

Brian has told others: “the money came out in pieces”. No statement of how many pieces or what pieces means. No mention of rubber bands or paper straps. Somebody in the FBI report above decided there were “there bundles”.  But, the above FBI statement does not make it clear if rubber bands were around each of three bundles, or if the rubber bands were around the whole find?   Where on the found money did INGRAMs brother-in-law remove rubber bands, or rubber band fragments. And there is no mention of paper straps in any of this.

At best the evidence is ambiguous and unclear. No FBI forensic report mentions looking for or finding rubber band fragments on any of the bills – and no paper strap remains either. FJ explains the paper straps away by saying they all “dissolved” over time.
 
The Federal Reserve rules which applied in 1971 say:

"How many bills are in a strap?"      -        Himmelsbach used the word STRAP.

"A ‘strap’ is a package of 100 notes regardless of denomination. A ‘bundle’ consists of 1,000 notes of the same denomination in ten equal straps of 100 notes each. Before depositing currency, currency must be prepared according to denomination. For $1 through $20 denominations, your deposit(s) must contain full ‘bundles’."

How were the bills being stored at SeaFirst before they were used to package a ransom for delivery to Cooper – anyone know? I thought we already knew the answer to that question but now, under the Fkyjack and Blevins regime at Dropzone, I not going to hazard saying anything about that! Anyone else dare answer or cares?

So, I guess it’s Carr and his witnesses and maybe Tom Kaye, vs Flyjack at Dropzone. Good luck to all and have a Merry Christmas!   
17
DB Cooper / Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Last post by georger on June 28, 2020, 02:12:04 PM »
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Sketches, Bottom Line

I've learned a few things about the sketches from Nat:

1. Tina and Alice liked the Composite A best. Flo was luke-warm.
2. Flo didn't think it was nasty enough, and eventually Composite B was developed about 8 months later. Eventually, all 3 FAs approved Composite B as a good likeness.
3. Over time, Flo didn't like B either, so in the 1980s made her own composite sketch, which I find downright scary.
4. Composite A was developed in Minneapolis with Alice, Flo, And Tina all together. Several versions were developed and then shown to "other witnesses," presumably the passengers, most likely Gregory, Mitchell, House, Spreckel and Labissioniere.
5. The initial A sketch didn't have any eyes, so it was hard to get a real good sense of the "likeness." Eyes and glasses were added later.
6. Composite B began in August of 1972, but it took almost another six months of passing several versions around to the three FAs and the group of "other witness" for final approval. The initial sketching of B with Roy Rose took place remotely. All 3 FAs were home and sent in their suggestions to Rose via separate FBI teletypes.
7. Nat's analysis comes from the 2011 interview with Rose - done by somebody - and the FBI 302s that are now available.
8. I'm not seeing any special weight given to any individual, such as Bill Mitchell, or discounted by too much emotionality, such as Flo.

Well this is all interesting, if not entertaining.  It's a level above the previous DZ/Weber discussions about sketches posted years ago. Somebody has done some actual research, for a change.

I see the Cooper hijacking as a low level 'poor man's' enterprise; not a CIA operation. If it was done to get funds, then the price was way too low! $500k should have been asked for. What grudge did Hunt have that applies to 'airlines'? And the same for any of Hunt's colleagues. Who would hire Hunt and his thugs to do an airline hijacking which has nothing to do with geopolitics? From Cooper's comments his hijacking was personal with no obvious geopolitical connection. It might be someone who worked with Hunt, a Latin person who works cheap, who didnt even have a personal parachute to bring to the party?

18
DB Cooper / Re: New Forum & News Updates
« Last post by Darren on June 28, 2020, 01:25:40 PM »
‪Drew Beeson’s book Paratrooper Of Fortune: The Story of Ted B Braden is out now on Kindle with the paperback coming soon. Check it out guys, it’s really good.

‪Paratrooper of Fortune: The Story of Ted B. Braden - Vietnam Com... You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
19
DB Cooper / Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Last post by Bruce A. Smith on June 28, 2020, 02:51:41 AM »
Sketches, Bottom Line

I've learned a few things about the sketches from Nat:

1. Tina and Alice liked the Composite A best. Flo was luke-warm.
2. Flo didn't think it was nasty enough, and eventually Composite B was developed about 8 months later. Eventually, all 3 FAs approved Composite B as a good likeness.
3. Over time, Flo didn't like B either, so in the 1980s made her own composite sketch, which I find downright scary.
4. Composite A was developed in Minneapolis with Alice, Flo, And Tina all together. Several versions were developed and then shown to "other witnesses," presumably the passengers, most likely Gregory, Mitchell, House, Spreckel and Labissioniere.
5. The initial A sketch didn't have any eyes, so it was hard to get a real good sense of the "likeness." Eyes and glasses were added later.
6. Composite B began in August of 1972, but it took almost another six months of passing several versions around to the three FAs and the group of "other witness" for final approval. The initial sketching of B with Roy Rose took place remotely. All 3 FAs were home and sent in their suggestions to Rose via separate FBI teletypes.
7. Nat's analysis comes from the 2011 interview with Rose - done by somebody - and the FBI 302s that are now available.
8. I'm not seeing any special weight given to any individual, such as Bill Mitchell, or discounted by too much emotionality, such as Flo.
20
DB Cooper / Re: Clues, Documents And Evidence About The Case
« Last post by Bruce A. Smith on June 28, 2020, 02:40:10 AM »
The Sketches

The work that Nat Loufoque did on the sketches is invaluable. I poo-poohed it initially, but I have re-read his book more carefully and will be incorporating a lot of his work into my chapters on the profile of DB Cooper and his physical appearance.

I've exchanged a few emails with Nat concerning this development, and I thought a recent email from Nat would be worth posting here:


"Although I understand the confusion, I never meant to imply that Hunt skyjacked the plane at the behest of the Nixon administration. The reason I brought up Watergate and the burglary of Ellsberg's psychiatrist's office is because--like the Cooper heist--they took place over holiday weekends, so there's a common modus operandi. If Hunt was Cooper, Hunt was acting mostly on behalf of Hunt, not Nixon. In my book I raised the possibility that Cooper--whoever he was--might have been in cahoots with the CIA on some level, and pointed out that the CIA certainly was not happy about all the airliners being hijacked and diverted to Cuba, but the motive I ascribe to Hunt is that he was angry about the CIA not changing his annuity from a single to that of a joint, and was bitter about the way the CIA treated him in general. My theory is that this was all about Hunt finding a way to secure his retirement while sending an FU message to the CIA. And if you think about it, the CIA was in kind of a bad position here. They had to know that Cooper must have had inside knowledge about the ongoing Air America program, so if Cooper were to be apprehended there was a good chance he'd threaten to disclose information about Air America as a bargaining chip.

"Of course, Hunt would have been aware that smuggling a bomb on board a plane would have been a great way to spotlight the problems of lax airport security. I had to allow for the possibility that part of his motive was to find some way to cut down on airliners being diverted to Cuba. If Hunt viewed himself as James Bond, he regarded Fidel Castro as Ernst Blofeld, and nothing would have made Hunt happier than to cut down on the attention the Castro regime received each time another crackpot hijacked a plane to Cuba. But if anything, improving airport security was a pretext Hunt hid behind in his effort to come up with money he felt he was owed.

"I should add that I'm not a fan of conspiracy theories, other than those conspiracies that arise in order to cover up past crimes, as in the Watergate break-in.

"You're slightly off on the timing of the B sketches. They were begun on August 7th, 1972, so roughly eight months after the Cooper incident. Because of the crazy way the FBI put the B sketches together, it took about five months for them to end up with the final B sketches. One thing to keep in mind is, the first (Bing Crosby) sketch was done while Rose was in the room with the three stewardesses. But the witness interviews for the B sketches were conducted by field agents and sent to Rose via teletype machines, a much less reliable method. Honestly I don't see how anyone takes the B sketches seriously.

"Your last point about the sketches is correct, though. There was definitely dissent among the witnesses about which was the more accurate sketch. On September 26th, Mucklow was shown one of the B sketches and said the original conception was a better representation of the Unsub, and that the B sketch was not a good representation of the Unsub. She added that the artist's conception was not "him," and that his appearance was completely lost in the B sketch without the sunglasses. She also added that the hairline on the B sketch was incorrect, and that the hairline showing on the original conception was nearly identical to the suspect's. Then on October 4th another witness (presumably a passenger) was shown the same sketch. That witness told the FBI that the modified sketch no longer resembled his or her recollection of the Unsub, and that the original sketch was "much closer" to that of the Unsub.

"I find Hunt a compelling suspect in part because he had so many possible motives for the hijacking. I keep wondering if he had some reason to think he was dying. He wasn't, obviously, but did he get a medical diagnosis that he was, and for that reason was desperate to change his annuity? Who knows?"

--Nat

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