Author Topic: Sky Jacking Previous to D B Cooper  (Read 10685 times)

Offline 377

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Re: Boeing 727 Prototype used in drop test
« Reply #60 on: March 15, 2016, 01:54:29 PM »
"Things happen fast."

Funny, that's what my first jump instructor said about skydiving in general: "things happen fast".

He said "anyone can skydive when everything functions properly".

"But when it doesn't", he added, "your remaining lifespan can be measured either in seconds or years, its all up to you."

He kicked one young woman out of our class and refunded her money. She was a bit indecisive in her simulated emergency drills. I thought she could do OK if her life depended on it but the instructor didn't share my lenient opinion.

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Robert99

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Re: Boeing 727 Prototype used in drop test
« Reply #61 on: March 15, 2016, 02:33:57 PM »
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"Things happen fast."

Funny, that's what my first jump instructor said about skydiving in general: "things happen fast".

He said "anyone can skydive when everything functions properly".

"But when it doesn't", he added, "your remaining lifespan can be measured either in seconds or years, its all up to you."

He kicked one young woman out of our class and refunded her money. She was a bit indecisive in her simulated emergency drills. I thought she could do OK if her life depended on it but the instructor didn't share my lenient opinion.

377

There are some decisions that must be made in advance.  And this is especially true about aviation related activities when you often only have time to "react" and not to "analyze" during a problem.
 

Offline 377

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Re: Boeing 727 Prototype used in drop test
« Reply #62 on: March 15, 2016, 05:00:03 PM »
Problem is that you DO have to analyse. An emergency procedure appropriate for one kind of gear malfunction can be entirely wrong for a different kind of malfunction.

Having two inflated round canopies out is no big deal but two ram air squares can form a "downplane" and dive vertically at high speed.

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« Last Edit: March 15, 2016, 05:01:47 PM by 377 »
 

Offline 377

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Re: Boeing 727 Prototype used in drop test
« Reply #63 on: March 15, 2016, 05:04:38 PM »
I have the manual for the military 727 (C-22) and it mentions nothing about airdrops or deploying the stairs in flight. It is not significantly  different that the Continental 727 manual I have.

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Offline Shutter

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Re: Boeing 727 Prototype used in drop test
« Reply #64 on: March 16, 2016, 04:05:37 PM »
I was wondering how they released the sled in the testing. when you look at the video from the movie "The Pursuit Of DB Cooper" the stairs don't retract all the way up. Carr spoke with them, and claimed they wouldn't go faster than 150 knots, so how could 20+ knots more cause such a violent closing?

I'm thinking if they let the sled go down the stairs it would have a different effect on the stairs. perhaps, slinging it upward? I did a test a couple years ago using a piece of wood, and a hair dryer. I made a make shift pivoting stair, turned on the dryer (wind) and pushed it down a little, and it didn't spring up very good. then I took a small nut and let it go down the board and it flung upward? not very scientific, but it is what it is  8) 8)


« Last Edit: March 16, 2016, 04:29:40 PM by Shutter »
 

georger

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Re: Boeing 727 Prototype used in drop test
« Reply #65 on: March 18, 2016, 03:51:58 AM »
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I was wondering how they released the sled in the testing. when you look at the video from the movie "The Pursuit Of DB Cooper" the stairs don't retract all the way up. Carr spoke with them, and claimed they wouldn't go faster than 150 knots, so how could 20+ knots more cause such a violent closing?

I'm thinking if they let the sled go down the stairs it would have a different effect on the stairs. perhaps, slinging it upward? I did a test a couple years ago using a piece of wood, and a hair dryer. I made a make shift pivoting stair, turned on the dryer (wind) and pushed it down a little, and it didn't spring up very good. then I took a small nut and let it go down the board and it flung upward? not very scientific, but it is what it is  8) 8)



How stable were they for Cooper? Buffeting? The weight distribution) footprint of a person is different from that of the sled. Isnt the sled's footprint much larger? My guess is the stairs wouldn't drop all the way at first but the further down the stairs Cooper went the further down they dropped? 
 

Offline Shutter

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Re: Boeing 727 Prototype used in drop test
« Reply #66 on: March 18, 2016, 05:36:28 PM »
The sled should be entirely different. Cooper went down the stairs, I'm guessing, rather slowly. the sled barreled down like a roller coaster probably causing it to snap back upward quickly. I don't know if he had enough weight to get the stairs all the way down?
« Last Edit: March 18, 2016, 05:36:43 PM by Shutter »
 

Offline Shutter

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Re: Boeing 727 Prototype used in drop test
« Reply #67 on: March 18, 2016, 05:42:35 PM »
The photo from the movie appears to show the stairs were not all the way down. I took the screenshot just before he jumped..

I think the wind load on the door played more of a role than I thought. I remember in the movie, Robert Duvall was able to jump up, and pull the stairs down...so, it must of had a pretty heavy wind load on it...
« Last Edit: March 18, 2016, 07:13:29 PM by Shutter »
 

georger

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Re: Boeing 727 Prototype used in drop test
« Reply #68 on: March 19, 2016, 12:26:40 AM »
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The photo from the movie appears to show the stairs were not all the way down. I took the screenshot just before he jumped..

I think the wind load on the door played more of a role than I thought. I remember in the movie, Robert Duvall was able to jump up, and pull the stairs down...so, it must of had a pretty heavy wind load on it...

Pictures redone ...
 

Robert99

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Re: Boeing 727 Prototype used in drop test
« Reply #69 on: March 19, 2016, 12:59:34 AM »
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The photo from the movie appears to show the stairs were not all the way down. I took the screenshot just before he jumped..

I think the wind load on the door played more of a role than I thought. I remember in the movie, Robert Duvall was able to jump up, and pull the stairs down...so, it must of had a pretty heavy wind load on it...

Pictures redone ...

The 727 shown here is probably a 727-200 or later so there may be some differences due to the longer fuselage.  The original 727 (United Airlines N7001U) was not used in these tests since it was already in service with United.
 

Offline Shutter

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Re: Boeing 727 Prototype used in drop test
« Reply #70 on: March 19, 2016, 08:22:46 PM »
The plane in the screenshot is a 100 series...it was taken from the movie "The Pursuit Of DB Cooper"