Author Topic: DB Cooper: The Definitive Investigation  (Read 46566 times)

Offline Lynn

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Re: DB Cooper: The Definitive Investigation
« Reply #915 on: July 03, 2019, 09:59:52 PM »
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who is bashing. I don't follow?
I'm sorry, I don't know what you mean by "bashing"? I'm certainly not bashing the witnesses who identified him as Latin or Indigenous, but I just don't think anyone can be sure of someone's ethnicity 100% without any other cultural marker as a giveaway. Like, for about 40 years I though George Hamilton was Latin and had just changed his name, but no, he's fully Caucasian. There's also a difference between a two-week tan and one you've gotten from living in a hot country for many years, layers of tan- any of the Caucasian suspects recently back from Vietnam could have seemed non-Caucasian. You're certainly right that it's hard to pin down much specific about the DB description. The only things I would feel fairly sure of is that he was tall and middle-aged.
 

Offline Lynn

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Re: DB Cooper: The Definitive Investigation
« Reply #916 on: July 03, 2019, 10:08:34 PM »
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Quote
So many Coopers to choose from.

They were all Cooper. It's a new case now. all the evidence is gone. latin/American Indian are myths. olive skin, just a suntan. I don't think it was Northwest either.

I'm just here for crowd control...
Must point out - "Latin" is not a race. The impression that the person may have been Latin, in the repeatedly witnessed absence of accent, is entirely conjecture on any given witness' part. And "possibly brown" eyes described by one shaken witness is something I'm pretty comfortable dismissing altogether in a dim plane cabin.

The United States Census uses the ethnonym Hispanic or Latino to refer to "a person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin regardless of race".

The Revisions to OMB Directive 15 defines each racial and ethnic category as follows: American Indian or Alaska Native. Asian. Black or African American. Hispanic or Latino. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. White.

Racial group: A distinct population that is isolated in a particular area from other populations of a species, and consistently distinguishable from the others, e.g. morphology (or even only genetically). Geographic races are allopatric. Physiological race.

In physical anthropology: the term is one of the three general racial classifications of humans — Caucasoid, Mongoloid and Negroid. Under this classification scheme, humans are divisible into broad sub-groups based on phenotypic characteristics such as cranial and skeletal morphology.

Because all populations are genetically diverse, and because there is a complex relation between ancestry, genetic makeup and phenotype, and because racial categories are based on subjective evaluations of the traits, there is no specific gene that can be used to determine a person's race.

Haplogroup vs Haplotype? ... A haplotype is a group of genes in an organism that are inherited together from a single parent,[1][2] and a haplogroup, is a group of similar haplotypes that share a common ancestor with a single-nucleotide polymorphism mutation.[3][4].

Haplotype: Genetic variants are often inherited together in segments of DNA called haplotypes. ... The Haplotypes often are found occupying common geographical territories. Y-DNA Haplotypes - see attached.
  Excellent information. Again, I don't think an individual can ever been sure based on looks where someone is from. Recall seeing a Japanese-looking man in Japan but noticing the way he walked and thinking, "No, he's North American". And he was, Japanese heritage, US-raised. But it was much more to do with cultural nuances - how he carried himself -than his genetic makeup. (I've also been wrong dozens of times - though having lived in North Asia, I CAN tell a Korean from a Japanese from a Chinese person with about 95% accuracy. Yet I couldn't tell you exactly HOW I know. )
 

Offline Lynn

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Re: DB Cooper: The Definitive Investigation
« Reply #917 on: July 03, 2019, 10:10:38 PM »
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who is bashing. I don't follow?
I'm sorry, I don't know what you mean by "bashing"? I'm certainly not bashing the witnesses who identified him as Latin or Indigenous, but I just don't think anyone can be sure of someone's ethnicity 100% without any other cultural marker as a giveaway. Like, for about 40 years I though George Hamilton was Latin and had just changed his name, but no, he's fully Caucasian. There's also a difference between a two-week tan and one you've gotten from living in a hot country for many years, layers of tan- any of the Caucasian suspects recently back from Vietnam could have seemed non-Caucasian. You're certainly right that it's hard to pin down much specific about the DB description. The only things I would feel fairly sure of is that he was tall and middle-aged.
Oh, I said "basing" on, not bashing. I may have misspelled it the first time, am going blind in my impendimg dotage and forever re-editing.